News from Feb 2018

  • Alumni Profiles - West Point Grey Academy

    February 28, 2018

    The ISABC is excited to start sharing the acheivements of our member school's alumni.  ISABC schools educate and develop students to provide postive global impact after graduation.  We are looking forward to sharing just some of the ISABC alumni stories with you in the upcoming months.

    Read More Author: Body:

    The ISABC is excited to start sharing the acheivements of our member school's alumni.  ISABC schools educate and develop students to provide postive global impact after graduation.  We are looking forward to sharing just some of the ISABC alumni stories with you in the upcoming months.
     
    Our first alumni profiles come from West Point Grey Academy
     

    Riley Mari ’04 and Brandon Mari ’08
     
    Youth Education Farms (YEF), founded and run by Riley Mari ’04 and Brandon Mari ’08, is based in Swaziland. Riley started the charity following a summer abroad teaching at a school in Swaziland during his fourth year at UBC, where he graduated with a bachelor’s degree in human kinetics and a diploma in urban land economics. Riley was inspired by an orphan who had no means to support herself through school. He discovered that inaccessible education was a common theme among children in Swaziland, something we in North America take for granted.

    YEF was created to assist impoverished children—those unable to afford the fees required to attend school. In 2009, YEF’s first commercial farm was completed in Herefords, Swaziland. The farm creates jobs for local adults; the farm’s profits fund elementary and high school tuition fees for orphans or vulnerable children.

    YEF invests in students in the program who work hard at their studies. There are no handouts: everyone who works at the farm receives a salary, and children are required to attend a career planning and mentoring course, given every other Saturday, to receive the funding. The farm is self-sufficient and completely operated by the Swazi people, as is YEF’s grocery store and restaurant, which was established in 2013 and sells food from the farm.

    Through YEF, the Mari brothers hope to transform communities and shape leaders. As a social business, YEF creates a needed income source for residents and aims to develop a generation of future Swazi leaders, business owners and university graduates, all of whom will have the education and skills to help their communities grow and thrive.

    Riley and Brandon visit the farm about once a year but are based in Vancouver, where they focus on fundraising. (YEF’s Board of Directors covers the overhead in Canada and related expenses; 100 percent of the money donated to and raised by YEF goes back into the charity.)

    The brothers are also partners in retail and residential real estate development in Vancouver, which keeps them very busy. They stay connected with many former WPGA classmates and both love being part of the school’s alumni community.

    To learn more about YEF, and to consider donating to their monthly giving program, visit youtheducationfarms.com.
     
     

    Christian Anthony ’02
     
    Christian graduated from West Point Grey Academy’s second graduating class in 2002, where he studied hard, captained the varsity basketball and soccer teams, and was even taught by Prime Minister Justin Trudeau.

    After WPGA, Christian attended Gonzaga University in Washington. He first chose English as his major but soon decided a career in English was not for him. He then declared Journalism, Science, and Sports Management as majors. The finance courses within Sports Management would be life changing, as Christian discovered a passion for and natural affinity for finance, and ultimately chose Finance as his final major. In 2006, Christian graduated Cum Laude from Gonzaga.

    Later that year, Christian relocated to Calgary to do equity research for a major Canadian bank, where he was responsible for analyzing and recommending energy companies for investment. After four years, he moved back to Vancouver to work for the largest national investment bank, managing institutional pensions and mutual funds. Christian earned his chartered financial analyst (CFA) designation and, in 2013, joined an experienced team at a new investment firm, Pathfinder Asset Management Ltd., headquartered in downtown Vancouver.

    At Pathfinder, Christian is part of a firm focused on client satisfaction and returns. He was instrumental in developing Pathfinder’s “Equally Invested” culture, a more equitable investment management fee structure for a company’s employees. For Christian, this should be an industry standard. Christian chairs Pathfinder’s investment committee, manages the company’s Real Return fund and works directly with select clients.

    Christian is an avid sports fan and attended the 2017 NCAA Final Four Championships with his mother in Phoenix, where his alma mater was a rebound away from the national championship. He remains active in basketball, flag football, soccer and golf.
     
    Pictures (left picture, Christian Anthony; right picture, Riley Mari(left) and Brandon Mari(right)

    Category: Alumni Profiles Content Image (field_content_image:delta): 0 Date: Wednesday, February 28, 2018 Feature Image:
  • Alumni Profiles - West Point Grey Academy

    February 28, 2018

    The ISABC is excited to start sharing the acheivements of our member school's alumni.  ISABC schools educate and develop students to provide postive global impact after graduation.  We are looking forward to sharing just some of the ISABC alumni stories with you in the upcoming months.

    Read More Author: Body:

    The ISABC is excited to start sharing the acheivements of our member school's alumni.  ISABC schools educate and develop students to provide postive global impact after graduation.  We are looking forward to sharing just some of the ISABC alumni stories with you in the upcoming months.
     
    Our first alumni profiles come from West Point Grey Academy
     

    Riley Mari ’04 and Brandon Mari ’08
     
    Youth Education Farms (YEF), founded and run by Riley Mari ’04 and Brandon Mari ’08, is based in Swaziland. Riley started the charity following a summer abroad teaching at a school in Swaziland during his fourth year at UBC, where he graduated with a bachelor’s degree in human kinetics and a diploma in urban land economics. Riley was inspired by an orphan who had no means to support herself through school. He discovered that inaccessible education was a common theme among children in Swaziland, something we in North America take for granted.

    YEF was created to assist impoverished children—those unable to afford the fees required to attend school. In 2009, YEF’s first commercial farm was completed in Herefords, Swaziland. The farm creates jobs for local adults; the farm’s profits fund elementary and high school tuition fees for orphans or vulnerable children.

    YEF invests in students in the program who work hard at their studies. There are no handouts: everyone who works at the farm receives a salary, and children are required to attend a career planning and mentoring course, given every other Saturday, to receive the funding. The farm is self-sufficient and completely operated by the Swazi people, as is YEF’s grocery store and restaurant, which was established in 2013 and sells food from the farm.

    Through YEF, the Mari brothers hope to transform communities and shape leaders. As a social business, YEF creates a needed income source for residents and aims to develop a generation of future Swazi leaders, business owners and university graduates, all of whom will have the education and skills to help their communities grow and thrive.

    Riley and Brandon visit the farm about once a year but are based in Vancouver, where they focus on fundraising. (YEF’s Board of Directors covers the overhead in Canada and related expenses; 100 percent of the money donated to and raised by YEF goes back into the charity.)

    The brothers are also partners in retail and residential real estate development in Vancouver, which keeps them very busy. They stay connected with many former WPGA classmates and both love being part of the school’s alumni community.

    To learn more about YEF, and to consider donating to their monthly giving program, visit youtheducationfarms.com.
     
     

    Christian Anthony ’02
     
    Christian graduated from West Point Grey Academy’s second graduating class in 2002, where he studied hard, captained the varsity basketball and soccer teams, and was even taught by Prime Minister Justin Trudeau.

    After WPGA, Christian attended Gonzaga University in Washington. He first chose English as his major but soon decided a career in English was not for him. He then declared Journalism, Science, and Sports Management as majors. The finance courses within Sports Management would be life changing, as Christian discovered a passion for and natural affinity for finance, and ultimately chose Finance as his final major. In 2006, Christian graduated Cum Laude from Gonzaga.

    Later that year, Christian relocated to Calgary to do equity research for a major Canadian bank, where he was responsible for analyzing and recommending energy companies for investment. After four years, he moved back to Vancouver to work for the largest national investment bank, managing institutional pensions and mutual funds. Christian earned his chartered financial analyst (CFA) designation and, in 2013, joined an experienced team at a new investment firm, Pathfinder Asset Management Ltd., headquartered in downtown Vancouver.

    At Pathfinder, Christian is part of a firm focused on client satisfaction and returns. He was instrumental in developing Pathfinder’s “Equally Invested” culture, a more equitable investment management fee structure for a company’s employees. For Christian, this should be an industry standard. Christian chairs Pathfinder’s investment committee, manages the company’s Real Return fund and works directly with select clients.

    Christian is an avid sports fan and attended the 2017 NCAA Final Four Championships with his mother in Phoenix, where his alma mater was a rebound away from the national championship. He remains active in basketball, flag football, soccer and golf.
     
    Pictures (left picture, Christian Anthony; right picture, Riley Mari(left) and Brandon Mari(right)

    Category: Alumni Profiles Content Image (field_content_image:delta): 1 Date: Wednesday, February 28, 2018 Feature Image:
  • We're ADDING Room for the Future! Three have now become one

    February 16, 2018

    Three separate buildings have now become one continuous school.   Stratford Hall is pleased to announce that it has acquired the property at 3030-3038 Commercial Drive, expanding its footprint along Commercial Drive.    

    Read More Author: Isabel Sankaran-Wee, Director of Advancement Body:

    Three separate buildings have now become one continuous school.
     
    Stratford Hall is pleased to announce that it has acquired the property at 3030-3038 Commercial Drive, expanding its footprint along Commercial Drive.  
     
    Since its founding in 2000, Stratford Hall has grown steadily in response to rising demand for its outstanding IB programs. As such, the school has to ensure that facilities and infrastructure match its extraordinary programs. The purchase of this 9,000 square foot building will give Stratford Hall a combined footprint of 86,500 square feet of space for the whole school, stretching from the distinctive yellow ‘Diploma’ building on Commercial Drive and 14th Ave to the distinctive blue ‘Middle Years Program’ building on Commercial Drive and 15th Ave.
     
    Dr. Sue Groesbeck, Head of School, Interim, is thrilled: "This is a very exciting opportunity for the entire Stratford Hall community.  We will analyse our whole campus which now incorporates two full city blocks to plan out the future of Stratford's long term vision."

    Category: Achievement Content Image (field_content_image:delta): 0 Date: Friday, February 16, 2018 Feature Image:
  • Urbanism for eight-year-olds

    February 1, 2018

    It turns out eight year olds are also plugged into conversations about urbanism, affordability and neighbourhood change in Vancouver.

    Read More Author: Christopher Cheung Body:

    It turns out eight year olds are also plugged into conversations about urbanism, affordability and neighbourhood change in Vancouver.
    Lindsay Causey of independent school Stratford Hall is teaching a unit on “how we organize ourselves.” Students are learning about decisions we make as a society and their impact on people and the environment. They’ve touched on human geography and urban issues.
    Ms. Causey picked up a Metro one morning that had my story “Goodbye to the Vancouver we know?” on the growth of rich and poor enclaves in the region and a loss of diversity and mobility.
    She read it to her class.
    “Heavy stuff for Grade 3, but somehow we manage to navigate it,” she said. They just read a story about polar bears and climate change and talked about what it’s like to be displaced. “In a nutshell, we’re exploring cause and effect relationships.”
    Ms. Causey invited me to visit her class to talk cities and change. Curious what eight year olds thought of Vancouver, I accepted.
    Stratford Hall, an urban school, is three separate buildings across two blocks on Commercial Drive. Students and staff recently lobbied city hall to make their stretch of Commercial a school zone as they cross the busy arterial daily to use Clark Park. (There are no changes yet.)
    George, one of the students in Causey’s class, filled me in on what the area was like before urbanization – going back over 200 years.
    George lives nearby, and he put together a booklet of maps with his dad that chronicled local transformations. It was a personal project, not homework.
    “My favourite is a hand-drawn one [from 1865] because it just looks so cool,” he said. “I couldn’t believe you could get this map without using a computer. How did they even get a picture of this?”
    The maps include one of Vancouver’s Indigenous communities before colonization and one that shows Commercial Drive when it was Park Drive, before merchants rallied for the name change in 1911 to create business buzz.
    George was surprised to learn about the history of Trout Lake, where he often goes to play.
    “I thought Trout Lake would be just a lake,” he said, “but it actually filled boilers.” The lake supplied water to the Hastings Mill in the mid-1800s.
    The class and I chatted about how different families have different needs and make choices about spending based on what they can afford. What if they can’t buy a car? What if only one parent works? What if you only have one parent?
    I asked the class if they thought Vancouver was affordable.
    They were divided.
    “It depends on who you are,” said Quinn.
    Meghan complimented the SkyTrain. “It brings you to places if you don’t have a car!”
    Stratford Hall students are no stranger to the SkyTrain, which runs right by their windows. When it halts on the tracks due to snow, students wave to the stalled passengers.
    Rachel brought up another bedrock of urban life: neighbourhood “third places.”
    “I like The Mighty Oak.” It’s a mini grocery store and café. “I can walk there by myself,” she said.
    “When you don’t know someone, you’re just sitting there drinking your coffee. But if you know someone, you can start a conversation with the person who you know, and then their friends come in and you start a conversation and then you all become friends! That’s how my uncles got to know each other. You can get to know your friends’ friends’ friends!”
    The students also asked questions about homelessness. They’ve seen people sleep at Clark Park, where they play daily.
    “There was a man who was sleeping in a tent in a sleeping bag but then he went away,” said Rachel. “It was sad.”
    There’s a lot of change happening in the city that can be hard even for grown-ups to digest. Ms. Causey’s takeaway for her students?
    “Question why things are the way they are,” she said, “and come up with creative solutions when you see a potential problem or inequality.”
    It’s lesson for ages eight and up.

    Category: School News Content Image (field_content_image:delta): 0 Date: Thursday, February 1, 2018 Feature Image: